This month’s theme at the Pulp Zine is “FILM.” As you lovely babes already know, us dedicated followers of fashion already go goo-goo over film every month. This month differs from any of our previous loves, though. For DFOF, we are talking about our absolute, favorite films of ALL TIME. Enjoy~ xoxo, Tessa, Fashion Editor

Tessa:

dfof

Rushmore (1998)

As you lovely readers already know, I love Wes Anderson movies, and more importantly, I LOVE his 1998 film, Rushmore. Out of all of his colorful adventures, this one has to be my favorite for a series of reasons. Not only was the soundtrack a slew of some of my all-time-favorite songs, but it also had such a relatable main character. Max Fischer, played my Jason Schwartzman, is an awe-inspired teenage boy who is madly in love with the theatre, and a private school teacher. And most importantly, Max Fischer’s attire is absolutely flawless from his red beret to his school uniform.

tumblr_n5qurnEYkF1qf8ktzo1_500

 

Gabriel:

1624754_1471585103073482_1602757730_n copy

But I’m A Cheerleader (1999)

But I’m A Cheerleader was a breakthrough film for me. A close friend of mine showed it to me one afternoon in spring, and I have to say, watching it shocked me in an amazing way. People in the LGBTQ community are drastically underrepresented in mainstream media. In fact, I can’t think of a single time before the age of 15 that I saw a film–never mind a love story–with a gay main character. I can count on one hand the number of out-and-proud movie characters I’d seen, and even then they were always minor characters with no plot line of their own.

And even though the story But I’m A Cheerleader revolves around the characters’ sexual orientation, being LGBTQ is not the only facet of their being. They each have a backstory and a complicated relationship with the world around them, something denied to the LGBTQ characters I’d seen before. The teenagers in the movie overcome incredible hardship, struggling to find their way through the emotionally scarring experience of going to a “sexual redirection school,” a rehab program meant to “turn” them straight. The costume design’s impact on this experience is intriguing. Using colors typically associated with gender (pink, blue, and to an extent purple,) the experiences of the characters in the film are emphasized through the bold, surreal color-coordination that brings its coming-of-age tale to a whole new moving, dreamlike level.

1481235_1471585036406822_849248339_n

L.M. Strange:

Jon Rhys Meyers Kisses copy

Velvet Goldmine (1998)

    Velvet Goldmine, for me, was a film that activated more aesthetic pleasure sensors in my brain than I care to confess.  I can’t decide what aspect of the film left me with a burning desire to admit that I had found my favorite film; although I’m half-certain it had something to do with Jonathan Rhys Meyers’s infinitely frustrating pout. After my first viewing, I was left slack-jawed and with a heart bursting full of desire to illustrate and then crawl into bed with the era I so wholly connected with.  I imagined myself painting each delicate prism of color that clung to their costumes, hoping to somehow embody each godlike demand for attention with a brushstroke.  Maxwell Demon’s extravagant opening costume was a suit of armour fitting for the fictional peacock of rock.  The glittering dresses left you feeling bereft; and the shift from Mod to Bowie-style pop star drove home your own clamouring desires to epitomize and exemplify the style.  I’ve never seen a film like it, except maybe Cabaret.  Some films hold such a romance in their respective styles that it’s inconceivable to reproduce them without costume; and such is the individuality I find in Velvet Goldmine.  It’s something that never fails to inspire me – whether the inspiration lie in painting or picking an outfit.

Capture

Kiya:

Screen Shot 2014-05-17 at 8.48.47 AM

The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975)

Every. single. year. since the 7th grade I have asked my mother for a Columbia costume. And every. single. year, she says no. One day I asked her why, her response “where would you wear it?” I answered with, “To school, out, everywhere.” She stared at me and concluded our conversation with “that’s why.” Rocky Horror has been the love of my life since I first watched it five years ago. I’ve been inspired by the line “dont dream it, be it” MANY of times, and owe so much to this movie. It will always be my favorite movie and continues to be my inspiration for films I wite. I’m even in the process of getting my school to let me student direct it next year. (Cross your fingers for me!!)

10364211_659216854131915_858275903_n

Laura:

10331807_10203393140445995_650577802_n

Léon: The Professional (1994)

The story of an assassin and an orphaned girl, Leon the Professional is an exciting action filled film, complimented by an ambiguous love story. The acting is perfect with Jean Reno as Leon, the assassin and 11 year old Natalie Portman playing the female protagonist, Mathilda. Mathilda’s wardrobe makes me girl crush like never before. The mid 90s film presents us with an array of high waisted shorts, cute crop tops and hefty boots. Of course they’re all topped off with her infamous velvet sun choker, knitted orange beanie and round sunglasses. All of her outfits are so wearable now, my personal favourite being the black knitted crop top, white crochet cardigan, stripy shorts and doc martens. Her outfits are the perfect marriage between fun and innocent playful child and badass assassin.

10370741_10203393141566023_322305510_n

Featured image by: Saffa Khan

What is YOUR favorite film???

# # # # # # # # # # # # # # #

May 17, 2014

Comments

Should have referred to Mathilda as a “cleaner”! Although she did as much cleaning as a paint-pellet would allow. The significance of why she, as a little girl, adopted his beanie and sunglasses is always a touching thing to remember, as well. It’s a way for her to take his influence and incorporate it as part of her – something that explores her sentiment in regards to the clothing.

The whole post is nice, though. Film is a brilliant way to view how it’s production can explore older (or newer) eras and still retain an atmosphere of it’s origin. Maybe in a future post you could explore the very FUTURE that some films strive to portray?

I LOVE this!! They’re all great films and I love all the outfit sets inspired by them! My favorite has to be Rushmore and Leon the professional! ^_^

Comments closed